Bronze Connection
Walnut Display Cabinet
Section Name

Our modern take on a classic display cabinet will add a mid-century feel to any room. Minimalist but versatile, this display cabinet can be used to store away and display glassware and dinnerware, or simply as part storage, part bookshelf.

TYPES OF METALS
MAHOGANY
MAHOGANY

With its reddish-brown tones, mahogany is a perennially popular hardwood. Revered for its workability, mahogany is a durable and stable wood which responds well to machining, sanding, swelling, and shrinkage.

MAHOGANY
STEEL
STEEL

Timeless, durable, fashionable, and easy to maintain, the benefits of steel are numerous. There are practically no limits when working with steel, so it is ideal for when you want to create something otherwise inconceivable with wood. With many different types of steel, each with its own particular benefits, [most?] steel can be powder coated to add color to meet your needs. Steel pairs exceptionally well with glass—a combination very much suited to shelving units as well as both coffee tables and dining tables.

STEEL
COPPER
COPPER

A shiny, reddish substance, copper was the first metal to be exploited by humans, and it remains one of the most popular today. Famously resistant to corrosion, the appeal of copper has endured thanks to a combination of durability, its efficiency, and its timeless look, which has never gone out of fashion. Copper is an excellent choice for a sleek, contemporary look. Remarkably easy to work with, it is also very easy to keep clean, which is another consideration.

COPPER
BRONZE
BRONZE

Few other materials have left their mark upon civilization as Bronze has. An ancient metal, Bronze has been used functionally and decoratively for thousands of years and its popularity and appeal remain uncontested. From beds, to side-tables, to chairs, bronze furniture lends a distinguished look to any space. Its many great properties make it a superb material to craft furniture out of, and its antimicrobial properties make it particularly resistant to corrosion.

BRONZE
TYPES OF WOODS
OAK
OAK

In Latin, Oak is known as Quercus Robur, which translates to ‘robust timber.’ For centuries, Oak has enjoyed the well-deserved reputation of being one of the strongest and most durable woods widely available. Its attractive grain, high resistance to wear and tear, and its ability to be easily stained and varnished, means that oak is a great choice for all types of furniture.

OAK
ASH
ASH

Renowned for its high strength-to-weight ratio and its elasticity, ash is exceptionally useful where joinery is concerned. Solid, remarkably smooth, and with beautiful grain patterns, ash is a great choice for interior furniture, particularly cabinetry.

ASH
TYPES OF METALS
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But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness.

No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself.

Because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure.

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TYPES OF WOODS
TBD
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But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness.

No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself.

Because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure

Occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure

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